Bake Club Oatmeal Cookies

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Christina Tosi of Momofuku Milk Bar hosts a Bake Club every Monday afternoon on Instagram. She sends out an ingredient list the day before and each Monday at 2pm Eastern on Instagram Live, she teaches you how to make something. She plays great music and is really upbeat. It’s a lot of fun.

These are my new favorite oatmeal cookies. They’re chewy and not terribly sweet. Do you know what else I love about them? No raisins! The recipe comes from Christina Tosi’s grandmother who used to put a piece of bread in the container with the baked cookies to keep them soft. I haven’t needed to try that trick because these cookies don’t last long in our house.

Bake Club Oatmeal Cookies
Recipe by Christina Tosi

14 tablespoons butter (1 stick + 6 tablespoons) butter, softened
3/4 cup light brown sugar
1/2 cup granulated sugar
2 eggs
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
2 cups flour
2 1/4 cups old fashioned oats
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 cup powdered sugar

Heat the oven to 375 F.

In a large bowl, mix together butter granulated and brown sugars until well combined. Add in the eggs and vanilla and mix to combine.

Add in the dry ingredients and mix until just combined.

Scoop and roll the dough into golf-ball sized balls, roll in powdered sugar and place on a greased baking sheet 2-inches apart.

Bake for 9 minutes until they puff, crackle and spread with a golden brown edge.

Devour immediately or store in an airtight container.

Yield: 2 dozen cookies

One year ago: Polenta Florentine
Two years ago: Chouquettes
Three years ago: Chocolate Olive Oil Cake
Four years ago: Lemon White Chocolate Bars
Five years ago: Oatmeal Scotchies
Six years ago: Nutella Bisciuts
Seven years ago: Spinach and Chickpea Curry
Eight years ago: Salted Chocolate Caramels
Nine years ago: Ultimate Shepherd’s Pie
Ten years ago: Pink Grapefruit Sorbet
Eleven years ago: Tortillitas with Shrimp
Twelve years ago: Croissant Bread Pudding
Thirteen years ago: Basil Parmesan Chicken Salad

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Butternut Squash Salad with Farro and Pepitas

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This is one of my new favorite salads. It’s easy to put together and surprisingly tasty. A batch of quick-pickled onions adds great flavor. I liked it both at room temperature as well as warm. I didn’t have any pepitas, so I skipped them, but I am certain that they will be a welcome addition when I next make this, especially if they’re salted pepitas. I also didn’t add the cheese because my vegetarian son is not a huge cheese lover. I planned to add feta because I didn’t have ricotta salata. I’ll definitely add it next time. That said, this salad is incredibly delicious without the cheese and seeds. I find butternut squash difficult to peel, but this time I put it into a 350 degree oven for 10 minutes, it became quite easy to peel. Thank goodness for internet tips!

Butternut Squash Salad with Farro and Pepitas
Recipe from Smitten Kitchen

1 medium butternut squash (about 2 pounds)
5 to 6 tablespoons olive oil, divided
Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
1 cup semi-pearled farro
1/3 cup toasted pepitas
3 ounces ricotta salata or feta, crumbled or coarsely grated (about 3/4 cup)
2 tablespoons sherry vinegar or rice vinegar
1 tablespoon water
1/2 teaspoon table salt
1/2 teaspoon granulated sugar
1/2 small red onion, finely chopped

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Peel squash (see comments above about peeling butternut squash), then halve lengthwise and scoop out seeds. Cut squash into approximately 3/4-inch chunks. Coat a large baking sheet with 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Spread squash out in single layer on sheet. Sprinkle with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Roast until pieces are tender, about 30 to 40 minutes, turning them over halfway through the cooking time. Set aside to cool slightly.

While squash is roasting, cook farro in a large pot of simmering salted water until the grains are tender but chewy, about 30 minutes, or as long as is suggested on the box. Drain and cool slightly.

While squash and farro are cooking, whisk together vinegar, water, 1/2 teaspoon table salt and granulated sugar in a small bowl until sugar and salt dissolve. Stir in onion; it will barely be covered by vinegar mixture but don’t worry. Cover and keep in the refrigerator until needed; 30 minutes is ideal but less time will be ok.

In a large bowl, mix together butternut squash, farro, red onion and its vinegar brine, the crumbled cheese and pepitas. Toss with 3 tablespoons of the remaining olive oil, use the 4th one only if needed. Taste and adjust seasonings. I enjoy this both warm and at room temperature.



One year ago: Chocolate-Cherry Heart Smart Cookies
Two years ago: Plush Coconut Cake
Three years ago: Chocolate Olive Oil Cake
Four years ago: Cake Batter Truffles
Five years ago: No Bake Eclair Cake
Six years ago: Parker’s Split Pea Soup
Seven years ago: Citrus Seasoning Salt
Eight years ago: Caribbean Succotash
Nine years ago: Moroccan Carrot Dip
Ten years ago: Chewy Chocolate Cookies
Eleven years ago: Swedish Meatballs

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Lemon Meltaways

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My parents have been quarantining with us during the pandemic. We have loved every minute of the time we’ve spent together. The other day I asked my dad what his favorite cookie was and his simple response: lemon.

These cookies were a bit hit in our house and they didn’t last long. You don’t have to bake these all at once. You can keep a log of dough in the freezer until you’re in the mood for cookies. You then just slice and bake.

Lemon Meltaways
Recipe from the New York Times

1 cup unsalted butter, softened
2 cups confectioners’ sugar
1 – 2 tablespoons packed, finely grated lemon zest (I used the zest from a whole largish lemon)
2 generous tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 egg yolk
2 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 cup cornstarch
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

Add butter, 1 1/4 cups confectioners’ sugar, and lemon zest to the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Mix on low speed until the sugar is moistened, then turn the mixer to medium-high and beat until light and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Scrape down the sides of the bowl, and add the lemon juice and egg yolk. Mix to combine.

Reduce the speed to low, add the flour, cornstarch and salt, and mix until just combined.

Divide the dough into 2 pieces and set each piece on a length of parchment paper or plastic wrap. Fold the paper over the sticky dough, and use your hands to form it into a cylinder about 1 1/2 inches wide. Roll the cylinder a few times to help shape it, but don’t worry if it isn’t perfect. Chill the dough until completely firm, at least 2 hours. (I put mine in the freezer for about 20 minutes, which worked well.)

When you are ready to bake, heat oven to 350 degrees, and line two baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone baking mats.

Slice the dough into rounds just under 1/4-inch thick and arrange them at least 1-inch apart on the prepared baking sheets. Bake the cookies for 12 to 17 minutes, rotating the pans from top to bottom and front to back halfway though. The cookies should be golden around the edges, but not brown all of the way through.

Set the pans on cooling racks and cool for a few minutes. Dust both sides of the warm cookies with the remaining 3/4 cup/92 grams confectioners’ sugar. Let the cookies cool completely, then store at room temperature in an airtight container. Dust with additional confectioners’ sugar just before serving, if desired.

Yield: ~40 cookies



One year ago: Ultranutty Pecan Bars
Two years ago: Oatmeal Raisin Cookies
Three years ago: Louisa’s Cake
Four years ago: Salted Caramel and Chocolate Rice Krispie Squares
Five years ago: Chocolate Crinkle Cookies
Six years ago: Sweet Potato Sausage Soup
Seven years ago: Rich Chocolate Brownies
Eight years ago: Mint Chip Cookies
Nine years ago: Shrimp Toast
Ten years ago: Mac and Cheese
Eleven years ago: Peppermint Brownies

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Classic Buttermilk Waffles

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I know I’ve said this before, but these are REALLY my sons’ favorite waffles. It was a unanimous vote. This will now be my go-to waffle recipe for the boys.

The recipe calls for pastry flour OR all-purpose flour. I have only ever used all-purpose. Pastry flour is supposed to make them a bit lighter. The original recipe calls for optionally adding either pecan meal or almond flour for flavor. I didn’t have any, so I skipped it. I tossed a couple of chocolate chips into one batch, which the boys enjoyed.

With other waffle recipes that I make, you have to separately whip th egg whites. I love that this recipe doesn’t require that. The batter is a bit thicker than other waffle batters I have used, and I found that they took a couple of extra minutes to cook. The resulting waffles have a crispy exterior and almost a chewy interior.

If you don’t have buttermilk on hand, you can easily make your own using milk and either vinegar or lemon juice.

Classic Buttermilk Waffles
Recipe from King Arthur Flour

2 large eggs
1 3/4 cups buttermilk
8 tablespoons (1 stick) butter, melted, cooled
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
2 cups pastry flour or 1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons sugar*
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon salt

*leave out the sugar if you want savory waffles, for chicken and waffles, for instance

In a medium-sized mixing bowl, beat together the eggs, buttermilk, melted butter, and vanilla.

In a separate bowl whisk together the dry ingredients.

Combine the wet and dry ingredients, stirring just until nearly smooth; a few small lumps may remain.

Spray your waffle iron with a non-stick cooking spray before preheating it. Cook waffles according to the manufacturer’s directions. For an 8″ round waffle iron, use about 1/3 cup batter; cook for 2 to 3 minutes, or until the waffle iron stops steaming.




One year ago: Ultranutty Pecan Bars
Two years ago: Oatmeal Raisin Cookies
Three years ago: Cocoa Buttermilk Breakfast Biscuits with Brown Sugar Cinnamon Butter
Four years ago: Salted Caramel and Chocolate Rice Krispies Squares
Five years ago: Chocolate Crinkle Cookies
Six years ago: Chocolate Sugar Cookies
Seven years ago: English Muffin Bread
Eight years ago: Peppermint Chocolate Chip Sugar Cookies
Nine years ago: Salt ‘n’ Vinegar Roasted Potatoes
Ten years ago: Weeknight Bolognese
Eleven years ago: Krumkake
Twelve years ago: Mahogany Beef Stew with Red Wine and Hoisin Sauce

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Vanilla Custard Squares

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Our family LOVES puff pastry. We also LOVE custard, so this dessert is right up our alley. It’s somewhat time consuming to make, and you have to plan ahead because it needs to chill for four hours before you serve it, but it’s well worth the planning. Our family inhaled it.

Buying Pepperidge Farm puff pastry makes this easy, because there’s no need to roll the dough. It comes out of the package the perfect size. The photo above is the whole dessert, uncut. The photo below is one piece. One would think that the custard would ooze out when you tried to cut it, but miraculously, it doesn’t. This dessert will be on repeat in our house, especially when the boys are home from school.

Vanilla Custard Squares
Recipe from Smitten Kitchen

2 8.5-ounce sheets ready-rolled puffed pastry, defrosted [from a 1.1-pound (490-gram) package]
3/4 cup granulated sugar
6 tablespoons cornstarch
1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
2 large eggs
2 cups whole milk
3/4 cup heavy cream
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, diced

Prepare the pastry: Heat oven to 375°F. If your puffed pastry comes out of the box as a 9-inch square, no rolling is necessary. If your puffed pastry is not that size, roll it on a lightly floured surface until it’s roughly a 9-inch square. Take each piece and put it on its own parchment-lined baking sheet. Prick the puff pastry all over with a fork. This will hopefully prevent it from puffing up in the oven. Place another piece of parchment paper on top of each sheet, then another 1 or 2 baking sheets on top of the parchment paper to weigh it down. Bake the puff pastry in the oven for 18 to 20 minutes, then remove the baking sheet weights and top sheet of paper and bake for another 5 to 10 minutes, or until the puff pastry is golden brown. Set pastry aside to cool completely.

Line the base and sides of an 8×8-inch cake pan with a large sheet of foil so the excess goes up the sides. I learned from Smitten Kitchen that it helps to first mold the foil over the outside of the baking pan and then transfer it inside.

Place first cooled square of pastry on a cutting board and use bottom of the cake pan to cut it into a square that will fit tightly inside the pan. Repeat with second square. Place the first square inside the pan; save the second square until needed.

Make the custard: In a medium saucepan, whisk together sugar, starch, and salt. Add the eggs, one at a time, whisking until smooth and no pockets of sugar-starch remain before adding the second. Whisk in vanilla extract, and then, very gradually, whisking the whole time, pour in milk, then cream. Bring mixture to a simmer over medium heat, whisking the whole time. As the custard begins to bubble, it will thicken. Remove from heat and stir in the butter until it is fully melted.

Assemble the squares: Immediately pour the warm custard into the baking pan over the first sheet of puff pastry and spread evenly. Place the second sheet of pastry on top, pressing gently to secure in place.

Chill the squares: Cover the pan in plastic and refrigerate for at least 4 hours or overnight to allow the custard to fully set. Once chilled and set, use the foil to carefully lift the mixture from the tin. Dust with powdered sugar then use a sharp, serrated knife to cut it into squares.

These will keep for a couple of days if they’re wrapped up and kept in the refrigerator, but the puff pastry will soften the longer they are kept.

Yield: Sixteen small pieces



One year ago: Ultranutty Pecan Bars
Two years ago: Oatmeal Raisin Cookies
Three years ago: Louisa’s Cake
Four years ago: Hummus
Five years ago: Chocolate Crinkle Cookies
Six years ago: Mallobars
Seven years ago: Sweet Potato-Sausage Soup
Eight years ago: Marcus Samuelsson’s Spiced Coconut Lentil Soup
Nine years ago: Honey Roasted Almonds
Ten years ago: Cauliflower and Parmesan Cake
Eleven years ago: Chocolate Dipped Meringue Cookies
Twelve years ago: Snickerdoodles


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Moroccan Spiced Spaghetti Squash

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My mother wasn’t a huge fan of spaghetti squash, so she never served it when we were growing up, consequently, I never buy it when I see it appear in stores in the fall. Last week I stopped at one of the last farm stands that is still selling vegetables, and I saw a big pile of spaghetti squash, so I bought one.

Having a microwave makes this side dish a snap. You microwave the squash and while it’s cooking, you melt some butter and mix it with spices. When the squash is done, you remove the flesh from the skin (it sort of looks like spaghetti), mix it with the spiced butter and you have something delicious. Really delicious. I will make this a regular fall/winter side dish in our house. My mother really liked it too. I skipped the cilantro because my mother and one of my sons think cilantro tastes like soap!

Moroccan-Spiced Spaghetti Squash
Recipe from Epicurious.com

1 (3 1/2- to 4-pound) spaghetti squash
1/2 stick (4 tablespoons) unsalted butter, cut into pieces
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
1/8 teaspoon cayenne
3/4 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro (optional)

Pierce squash (about an inch deep) all over with a small sharp knife to prevent bursting. Cook in an 800-watt microwave oven on high power (100 percent) for 6 to 7 minutes. Turn squash over and microwave until squash feels slightly soft when pressed, 8 to 10 minutes more. Cool squash for 5 minutes.

Meanwhile, melt butter in a small heavy saucepan over medium high heat. Add garlic and cook, stirring, until golden, about 1 minute. Keep an eye on the garlic so it doesn’t burn. Stir in spices and salt and remove from heat.

Carefully halve squash lengthwise (it will give off steam) and remove and discard seeds. Working over a bowl, scrape squash flesh with a fork, loosening and separating strands as you remove it from skin. Toss with spiced butter and cilantro (if using.)

Yield: 4 servings


One year ago: Ultranutty Pecan Bars
Two years ago: Oatmeal Raisin Cookies
Three years ago: Cocoa Buttermilk Breakfast Biscuits with Brown Sugar Cinnamon Butter
Four years ago: Salted Caramel and Chocolate Rice Krispies Squares
Five years ago: Chocolate Crinkle Cookies
Six years ago: Chocolate Sugar Cookies
Seven years ago: English Muffin Bread
Eight years ago: Rich Chocolate Brownies
Nine years ago: Maple-Glazed Brussels Sprouts
Ten years ago: Honey Mustard Salad Dressing
Eleven years ago: Mac and Cheese
Twelve years ago: Peppermint Brownies

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Soft Peanut Butter Cookies

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I was looking for a recipe for soft peanut butter cookies because my Aunt Sylvia is sick and peanut butter cookies are her favorite. I stumbled across this recipe and I’m glad I did. The cookies were soft and delicious. They’re probably now one of my favorite peanut butter cookies. My boys inhaled them (the ones I didn’t mail to Aunt Sylvia.) It’s so nice to have the boys home from school for the holidays. They’re finishing up the semester from home, so we have lots of Zoom sessions going on daily with four boys all studying from home. I couldn’t be happier.

One more comment about the recipe. The original recipe called for rolling the dough in sugar before baking the cookies. I skipped this step and found that the extra sugar wasn’t needed at all.

Soft Peanut Butter Cookies
Recipe from Food.com

1 cup creamy peanut butter
1 cup packed brown sugar
1 cup white sugar
1 cup butter or 1 cup margarine, softened
2 eggs
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
1teaspoon vanilla extract
2 1⁄2 cups flour

Cream butter, peanut butter and both sugars together.

Add eggs, one at a time, beating well.

Add baking soda, powder and vanilla.

Stir in flour.

Roll into balls. Flatten cookies, using a fork, in a criss-cross pattern.

Bake on ungreased cookie sheet at 350 degrees for 7 – 8 minutes or adjust to suit your oven and size of cookies. You don’t want to overbake these.

Yield: depends. I made ~4 dozen cookies.



One year ago: Ultranutty Pecan Bars
Two years ago: Oatmeal Raisin Cookies
Three years ago: Loiusa’s Cake
Four years ago: Empanadas
Five years ago: Chocolate Crinkle Cookies
Six years ago: Corn-Shrimp Dumplings
Seven years ago: Sweet Potato-Sausage Soup
Eight years ago: Frosted Sugar Cookies
Nine years ago: Sweet Potato and Black Bean Chili
Ten years ago: Chocolate Candy Cane Cookies
Eleven years ago: Krumkake
Twelve years ago: Snickerdoodles

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Hummus II

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With a couple of vegetarians in the house, we go through a lot of hummus. I have another hummus recipe on the blog, but wanted to make sure I posted this one because it’s currently my favorite. i love the ratio of ingredients and the addition of cumin.

You can make this with canned chickpeas, but everytime I’ve made it, I’ve used dried chickpeas with great success. You need some advance planning because the chickpeas need to soak overnight. You boil them the next day. If you want to make this recipe using dried chickpeas, use about 3/4 cup of dried chickpeas.

Hummus
Recipe from Cookie & Kate

1 ½ cups cooked chickpeas (~3/4 cup dried) or 1 can (15 ounces) chickpeas, rinsed and drained
1/2 teaspoon baking soda (if you’re using canned chickpeas)
1/4 cup lemon juice (from 1 ½ to 2 lemons), more to taste
1 medium-to-large clove garlic, roughly chopped
1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt, to taste
1/2 cup tahini
2 to 4 tablespoons ice water, more as needed
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
Drizzle of olive oil and/or paprika for garnish (optional)

Put chickpeas in a large bowl and cover with cold water at least twice their volume. Leave to soak overnight.

The next day, drain chickpeas. In a medium saucepan, combine drained chickpeas and baking soda over high heat. Cook for about 3 minutes, stirring constantly. Add 6 1/2 cups water and bring to a boil. Cook at a simmer, skimming off any foam and any skins that float to the surface, from 20 and 40 minutes, depending on the type and freshness. Once done, they should be very tender, breaking easily when pressed between your thumb and finger, almost but not quite mushy. Drain the chickpeas.

In a food processor or high-powered blender, combine the lemon juice, garlic and salt. Process until the garlic is very finely chopped, then let the mixture rest so the garlic flavor can mellow, ideally 10 minutes or longer.

Add the tahini to the food processor and blend until the mixture is thick and creamy, stopping to scrape down any tahini stuck to the sides and bottom of the processor as necessary.

While running the food processor, drizzle in 2 tablespoons ice water. Scrape down the food processor, and blend until the mixture is ultra smooth, pale and creamy. (If your tahini was extra-thick to begin with, you might need to add 1 to 2 tablespoons more ice water.)

Add the cumin and the drained, over-cooked chickpeas to the food processor. While blending, drizzle in the olive oil. Blend until the mixture is super smooth, scraping down the sides of the processor as necessary, about 2 minutes. Add more ice water by the tablespoon if necessary to achieve a super creamy texture.

Taste, and adjust as necessary—sometimes I add a little extra salt and lemon juice.

Yield: ~2 cups of hummus

One year ago: Ultranutty Pecan Bars
Two years ago: Oatmeal Raisin Cookies
Three years ago: Loiusa’s Cake
Four years ago: Salted Caramel and Chocolate Rice Krispies Squares
Five years ago: Chocolate Crinkle Cookies
Six years ago: Mallobars
Seven years ago: English Muffin Bread
Eight years ago: Lots O’Meat Lasagna
Nine years ago: Pan-Seared Scallops in White Wine Sauce
Ten years ago: Shrimp Toast
Eleven years ago: Chocolate Dipped Meringue Cookies
Twelve years ago: Snickerdoodles

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Homemade Irish Cream

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After dinner, on a cold winter’s evening, there’s nothing better than a glass of Bailey’s Irish Cream, and if you don’t happen to have a bottle at home, you can make your own easily. It won’t take more than 10 minutes and it’s ready to drink as soon as you make it. My husband thinks the homemade version is better than the original. So do I. The beauty of this recipe is that you can tinker with it. If you want it creamier, add more cream, a little boozier, add more whiskey. You get the idea.

I have read that this keeps anywhere from two weeks to two months in the refrigerator. Ours will definitely not last that long.

Homemade Irish Cream
Recipe adapted slightly from Martha Stewart

1 cup heavy cream
1 (14 ounce) can sweetened condensed milk
1 teaspoon cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1 cup Irish whiskey (I used Jameson’s)

Sift the cocoa powder into the bottom of a pitcher and add a splash of cream. Mix these together until a thick paste forms. If you want to skip the sifting step, make sure that you mix all of the lumps out of the cocoa powder. Once you have a paste, add the rest of the cream in a couple of batches, mixing after each pour. When the cream and cocoa mixture is smooth, add the vanilla, whiskey and condensed milk. Voila, you’re ready to serve!

I serve mine on the rocks. Enjoy!

Yield: ~ 8 servings (not quite four cups of Irish Cream)

One year ago: Ultranutty Pecan Bars
Two years ago: Oatmeal Raisin Cookies
Three years ago: Cocoa Buttermilk Breakfast Biscuits with Brown Sugar Cinnamon Butter
Four years ago: Tomato, Melted Leek and Feta Galette
Five years ago: Chocolate Crinkle Cookies
Six years ago: Chocolate Sugar Cookies
Seven years ago: English Muffin Bread
Eight years ago: Peppermint Chocolate Chip Sugar Cookies
Nine years ago: Champagne Cosmos
Ten years ago: Green Beans with Meyer Lemon Vinaigrette and Parmesan Breadcrumbs
Eleven years ago: Mac and Cheese NB: this is my go-to mac and cheese
Twelve years ago: Peppermint Brownies









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Cashew Cinnamon Energy Bites

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This is my new favorite snack / dessert. I have a couple of my boys hooked on these too. They’re a four ingredient, all natural, sweet treat. We keep ours in the freezer, but keeping them in the refrigerator will make them slightly easier to eat. I could eat these day and night.

Our boys just got home from their first semester away in college. The pandemic didn’t make it easy for them, but I am so grateful to have them home. The house is full again!


Cashew Cinnamon Energy Bites
Recipe adapted slightly from DeliciouslyElla.com via The Costco Connection

1/2 cup rolled oats
1 cup cashews
1 cup pitted dates
2 heaping teaspoons ground cinnamon

Pulse the oats and cashews in a food processor until they form a flour. Add the pitted dates and cinnamon to the food processor. Blend until everything forms a sticky dough. Roll the mixture into 12 balls and refrigerate for an hour to set, then store refrigerated in an airtight container.

Yield: 12 energy bites


One year ago: Ultranutty Pecan Bars
Two years ago: Oatmeal Raisin Cookies
Three years ago: Loiusa’s Cake
Four years ago: Pumpkin Lentil Soup
Five years ago: Chocolate Crinkle Cookies
Six years ago: Mallobars
Seven years ago: Sweet Potato Sausage Soup
Eight years ago: Marcus Samuelsson’s Spiced Coconut Lentil Soup
Nine years ago: Rosemary-Lemon Sandwich Cookies
Ten years ago: Weeknight Bolognese
Eleven years ago: Chocolate Malted Whopper Drops
Twelve years ago: Mahogany Beef Stew with Red Wine and Hoisin Sauce

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